Identifying Developmental Toys for your Child

two children playing with wooden dinosaur toys

Identifying Developmental Toys for your Child

two children playing with wooden dinosaur toys

Identifying Developmental Toys for your Child

Cardboard boxes, fire trucks, pots and pans, figurines and dolls. These are some of the more common items/toys we see our children gravitate towards. We see that attraction and inquisitivity when they pick up a toy; we see their eyes light up. In a world where our children learn from play, the selection of toys play a big role in not only entertaining our children, but also helping them develop social and emotional skills, and educate them to understand the world. 

As natural learners, our children turn toys into valuable tools using their imagination and explorative personas. Some toys are more beneficial in the sense that they incorporate more teaching concepts and creativity, providing your child with a better learning experience.

animated wooden blocks forming a castle

via Giphy

Leave it to the Imagination

Truth be told, we love toys that are battery-operated. They are entertaining, produce music, movements and even sounds! No harm letting your child play with these but if you intend to cultivate better creativity and imagination, introduce toys with no batteries. This allows the toy to be used in ways that go beyond what they are built for. Your child’s imagination won’t be limited. Take a toy car or a doll, for example--they could do far more with imagination as compared to the two or three moves/features they have inbuilt in them if they were battery-operated. Let your child be the storyteller as their language skills and attention span improves. 

Toy Story kid playing with buzz lightyear

via Giphy

A little puzzled?

The missing puzzle piece is a greater adventure than you think it is! Give your child a puzzle piece and help them build on the physical skills (holding the pieces and turning them around until they fit), cognitive skills (thinking how to correctly find that perfect fit) and emotional skills (learning to practice patience, awaiting the reward and the feeling of accomplishment). From problem-solving skills, perseverance and developing finger dexterity, the simple tasks of picking up, twisting and moving the pieces builds their finger strength and hand-eye coordination.

smart baby playing with shape sorting toy

via Giphy

Hey there, Einstein! 

Science is a subject that encompasses various concepts of how our world works. Introduce your child to the fun and engaging tools that help them promote discovery, develop imagination and improve on math and science subjects! Try out telescopes, binoculars, chemistry sets, rocket-launching, circuit-making and butterfly-hatching hands-on kits to pique their interest and bring out their curiosity.

Toy Story Rex looking into a microscope

via Giphy

YOU! That’s Right 

A child stacking lego blocks or painting with watercolours are independent activities. In fact, a fair bit of them let your child venture on their own. But did you know that sometimes being there physically makes a world of difference for your child’s learning? Sitting next to your child and showing them how to stack blocks, turn on games, paint, read or play helps them build on their self-esteem and gives them the necessary attention that helps them feel loved, nurtured and secured. Ultimately it’s you who knows your child best, and it’s you who can determine their likes, dislikes, interests, skills level, favourite characters and various things that they enjoy. You hold a significant role in nurturing them!

Father marching with son in circles

via Giphy

two children playing with wooden dinosaur toys

Identifying Developmental Toys for your Child

Cardboard boxes, fire trucks, pots and pans, figurines and dolls. These are some of the more common items/toys we see our children gravitate towards. We see that attraction and inquisitivity when they pick up a toy; we see their eyes light up. In a world where our children learn from play, the selection of toys play a big role in not only entertaining our children, but also helping them develop social and emotional skills, and educate them to understand the world. 

As natural learners, our children turn toys into valuable tools using their imagination and explorative personas. Some toys are more beneficial in the sense that they incorporate more teaching concepts and creativity, providing your child with a better learning experience.

animated wooden blocks forming a castle

via Giphy

Leave it to the Imagination

Truth be told, we love toys that are battery-operated. They are entertaining, produce music, movements and even sounds! No harm letting your child play with these but if you intend to cultivate better creativity and imagination, introduce toys with no batteries. This allows the toy to be used in ways that go beyond what they are built for. Your child’s imagination won’t be limited. Take a toy car or a doll, for example--they could do far more with imagination as compared to the two or three moves/features they have inbuilt in them if they were battery-operated. Let your child be the storyteller as their language skills and attention span improves. 

Toy Story kid playing with buzz lightyear

via Giphy

A little puzzled?

The missing puzzle piece is a greater adventure than you think it is! Give your child a puzzle piece and help them build on the physical skills (holding the pieces and turning them around until they fit), cognitive skills (thinking how to correctly find that perfect fit) and emotional skills (learning to practice patience, awaiting the reward and the feeling of accomplishment). From problem-solving skills, perseverance and developing finger dexterity, the simple tasks of picking up, twisting and moving the pieces builds their finger strength and hand-eye coordination.

smart baby playing with shape sorting toy

via Giphy

Hey there, Einstein! 

Science is a subject that encompasses various concepts of how our world works. Introduce your child to the fun and engaging tools that help them promote discovery, develop imagination and improve on math and science subjects! Try out telescopes, binoculars, chemistry sets, rocket-launching, circuit-making and butterfly-hatching hands-on kits to pique their interest and bring out their curiosity.

Toy Story Rex looking into a microscope

via Giphy

YOU! That’s Right 

A child stacking lego blocks or painting with watercolours are independent activities. In fact, a fair bit of them let your child venture on their own. But did you know that sometimes being there physically makes a world of difference for your child’s learning? Sitting next to your child and showing them how to stack blocks, turn on games, paint, read or play helps them build on their self-esteem and gives them the necessary attention that helps them feel loved, nurtured and secured. Ultimately it’s you who knows your child best, and it’s you who can determine their likes, dislikes, interests, skills level, favourite characters and various things that they enjoy. You hold a significant role in nurturing them!

Father marching with son in circles

via Giphy

two children playing with wooden dinosaur toys

Identifying Developmental Toys for your Child

Cardboard boxes, fire trucks, pots and pans, figurines and dolls. These are some of the more common items/toys we see our children gravitate towards. We see that attraction and inquisitivity when they pick up a toy; we see their eyes light up. In a world where our children learn from play, the selection of toys play a big role in not only entertaining our children, but also helping them develop social and emotional skills, and educate them to understand the world. 

As natural learners, our children turn toys into valuable tools using their imagination and explorative personas. Some toys are more beneficial in the sense that they incorporate more teaching concepts and creativity, providing your child with a better learning experience.

animated wooden blocks forming a castle

via Giphy

Leave it to the Imagination

Truth be told, we love toys that are battery-operated. They are entertaining, produce music, movements and even sounds! No harm letting your child play with these but if you intend to cultivate better creativity and imagination, introduce toys with no batteries. This allows the toy to be used in ways that go beyond what they are built for. Your child’s imagination won’t be limited. Take a toy car or a doll, for example--they could do far more with imagination as compared to the two or three moves/features they have inbuilt in them if they were battery-operated. Let your child be the storyteller as their language skills and attention span improves. 

Toy Story kid playing with buzz lightyear

via Giphy

A little puzzled?

The missing puzzle piece is a greater adventure than you think it is! Give your child a puzzle piece and help them build on the physical skills (holding the pieces and turning them around until they fit), cognitive skills (thinking how to correctly find that perfect fit) and emotional skills (learning to practice patience, awaiting the reward and the feeling of accomplishment). From problem-solving skills, perseverance and developing finger dexterity, the simple tasks of picking up, twisting and moving the pieces builds their finger strength and hand-eye coordination.

smart baby playing with shape sorting toy

via Giphy

Hey there, Einstein! 

Science is a subject that encompasses various concepts of how our world works. Introduce your child to the fun and engaging tools that help them promote discovery, develop imagination and improve on math and science subjects! Try out telescopes, binoculars, chemistry sets, rocket-launching, circuit-making and butterfly-hatching hands-on kits to pique their interest and bring out their curiosity.

Toy Story Rex looking into a microscope

via Giphy

YOU! That’s Right 

A child stacking lego blocks or painting with watercolours are independent activities. In fact, a fair bit of them let your child venture on their own. But did you know that sometimes being there physically makes a world of difference for your child’s learning? Sitting next to your child and showing them how to stack blocks, turn on games, paint, read or play helps them build on their self-esteem and gives them the necessary attention that helps them feel loved, nurtured and secured. Ultimately it’s you who knows your child best, and it’s you who can determine their likes, dislikes, interests, skills level, favourite characters and various things that they enjoy. You hold a significant role in nurturing them!

Father marching with son in circles

via Giphy

two children playing with wooden dinosaur toys

Identifying Developmental Toys for your Child

Cardboard boxes, fire trucks, pots and pans, figurines and dolls. These are some of the more common items/toys we see our children gravitate towards. We see that attraction and inquisitivity when they pick up a toy; we see their eyes light up. In a world where our children learn from play, the selection of toys play a big role in not only entertaining our children, but also helping them develop social and emotional skills, and educate them to understand the world. 

As natural learners, our children turn toys into valuable tools using their imagination and explorative personas. Some toys are more beneficial in the sense that they incorporate more teaching concepts and creativity, providing your child with a better learning experience.

animated wooden blocks forming a castle

via Giphy

Leave it to the Imagination

Truth be told, we love toys that are battery-operated. They are entertaining, produce music, movements and even sounds! No harm letting your child play with these but if you intend to cultivate better creativity and imagination, introduce toys with no batteries. This allows the toy to be used in ways that go beyond what they are built for. Your child’s imagination won’t be limited. Take a toy car or a doll, for example--they could do far more with imagination as compared to the two or three moves/features they have inbuilt in them if they were battery-operated. Let your child be the storyteller as their language skills and attention span improves. 

Toy Story kid playing with buzz lightyear

via Giphy

A little puzzled?

The missing puzzle piece is a greater adventure than you think it is! Give your child a puzzle piece and help them build on the physical skills (holding the pieces and turning them around until they fit), cognitive skills (thinking how to correctly find that perfect fit) and emotional skills (learning to practice patience, awaiting the reward and the feeling of accomplishment). From problem-solving skills, perseverance and developing finger dexterity, the simple tasks of picking up, twisting and moving the pieces builds their finger strength and hand-eye coordination.

smart baby playing with shape sorting toy

via Giphy

Hey there, Einstein! 

Science is a subject that encompasses various concepts of how our world works. Introduce your child to the fun and engaging tools that help them promote discovery, develop imagination and improve on math and science subjects! Try out telescopes, binoculars, chemistry sets, rocket-launching, circuit-making and butterfly-hatching hands-on kits to pique their interest and bring out their curiosity.

Toy Story Rex looking into a microscope

via Giphy

YOU! That’s Right 

A child stacking lego blocks or painting with watercolours are independent activities. In fact, a fair bit of them let your child venture on their own. But did you know that sometimes being there physically makes a world of difference for your child’s learning? Sitting next to your child and showing them how to stack blocks, turn on games, paint, read or play helps them build on their self-esteem and gives them the necessary attention that helps them feel loved, nurtured and secured. Ultimately it’s you who knows your child best, and it’s you who can determine their likes, dislikes, interests, skills level, favourite characters and various things that they enjoy. You hold a significant role in nurturing them!

Father marching with son in circles

via Giphy



Location

45 Burghley Drive
#01-02/03
Singapore 559022

Opening Hours

Monday - Thursday
8AM to 4PM
Friday 8AM to 1PM

Contact Us

+65 6287 2322
info@chickyolive.com
chickyolive@gmail.com

Stay Connected

Location

45 Burghley Drive
#01-02/03
Singapore 559022

Opening Hours

Monday - Thursday
8AM to 4PM
Friday 8AM to 1PM

Contact Us

+65 6287 2322
info@chickyolive.com
chickyolive@gmail.com

Stay Connected

Location

45 Burghley Drive
#01-02/03
Singapore 559022

Contact Us

+65 6287 2322
info@chickyolive.com
chickyolive@gmail.com

Opening Hours

Monday - Thursday
8AM to 4PM
Friday 8AM to 1PM

Stay Connected